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New dementia strategy launched to help thousands across Birmingham and Solihull

Veteran broadcaster and dementia awareness champion, Angela Rippon, will launch a strategy to help thousands of people living with dementia across Birmingham and Solihull.

Birmingham CrossCity Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), working with Solihull CCG, Birmingham City Council, Solihull Council and other local NHS CCGs, will present its strategy 'Give me something to believe in: Birmingham and Solihull Dementia Strategy 2014-17’ today (May 19) at a public event.

The event will be introduced by Alzheimer’s Society ambassador, Angela Rippon, who has spoken of her experiences caring for her mother who was diagnosed with dementia and died in 2009.

The strategy is a joint partnership document which sets out what is currently in place as well as what should be in place for people with dementia, and a framework for partners to use when planning services.

Taking place at Birmingham City Football Club, the event will host more than 200 people, who will be able to take part in workshops and receive advice, information and help about dementia.

The launch event will include:

  • A short film about the various aspects of living with dementia
  • A talk by Dementia Action Alliance
  • A choice of workshops designed for carers, clinicians, and those living with dementia

Dr Aqil Chaudary, dementia health lead for Birmingham CrossCity CCG, said: “This strategy has been created to improve the lives of more than 16,500 people in Birmingham and Solihull who are living with dementia. The title of the strategy 'give me something to believe in’ is at the heart of this work, which is dedicated to ensuring people with dementia, their family and carers get the help and support they need.

“We know that more people are being diagnosed with dementia, so it’s crucial that the feedback we’ve received has been included and embedded in the strategy to improve people’s lives now and in years to come.”

The presentation of the Birmingham and Solihull dementia strategy coincides with Dementia Awareness Week (18-24 May 2014).

Alan Lotinga, Service Director for Health and Wellbeing at Birmingham City Council, said: "It's important to stress that we've listened to people with dementia, their carers and their families before outlining the services we think should be in place for people.

 “Dementia is one of the biggest challenges we face and this strategy underlines our commitment that people in Birmingham and Solihull living with dementia will have improved health and a better quality of life."

A spokesperson for Solihull Council said: “Dementia is a particular challenge here in Solihull as we have a higher proportion of older people in our population compared with our neighbours.  

“The new strategy will help us meet this challenge by focusing our efforts on providing the services, support and advice that people living with dementia and their carers need, and that make the most difference to their lives, recruiting over 4,500 people to become dementia friends or champions.”

Ends

Notes to editors

Statistics from the Dementia Prevalence Calculator show, based on 2011 data, there are 13,819 people in Birmingham with dementia and 2,798 in Solihull, around 800,000 in the UK in total. We expect the numbers to grow from 13,819 to 16,300 in Birmingham and from  2,798 to 3,800 in Solihull by 2021.

Birmingham and Solihull Dementia Strategy 2014-17 is a joint partnership document by Birmingham CrossCity CCG, Solihull CCG, Birmingham City Council, Solihull Council, Birmingham South Central CCG and Sandwell and West Birmingham. 

'Give me something to believe in – Birmingham and Solihull Dementia Strategy 2014-17’ has been developed using feedback from people with dementia, their families and carers. It draws upon national strategic drivers including Living Well with Dementia, the National Dementia Strategy 2009, and The Prime Minister’s Challenge on Dementia – Delivering Major Improvements in Dementia Care and Research by 2015.

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